Q & A: Seneca B

Kick back with Boston's Own: Seneca B. 

Listen to "Sky" as you read through our Q & A:

NLITEN:

Rumor has it you just got accepted into Stanford Law for grad school. Is Seneca B is a straight-A student?


SENECA B:

Yes I was. I’ve kept good grades at UMass Lowell but even then I never thought I’d be able to get into a place like that. I’m really excited for it though!


NLITEN:

Very few people are able to balance academics and their creative pursuits…how do u manage it all?

SENECA B:

I think the key to my success is holding myself to extremely high standards. I don’t want to just get by, I want to be the best at whatever I do. I know I probably won’t ever be the best but at least trying is half the battle in my opinion. Managing school, work and music was difficult but I see it as a what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger mentality. Even though it sucked at times, it made me a better person to be able to do it and succeed on top of it. Another thing that helped me with work-life balance was a lesson I learned from my professor in freshman year. Basically, he taught me that sometimes you have to do shitty things in life so instead of trying to avoid them, why not embrace them and use them as learning experiences? For example, going to work and looking at what you can get out of it rather than just wishing you weren’t there (new friends, work ethic, good experiences). That lesson helped me out so much because I spend a lot of time doing things I’d rather not be doing but I try to make the best of it so it’s not as stressful or tiring (and sometimes really cool). Also not watching TV helps! In sum, I think I’m lucky to be here and to be alive so I try to be as appreciative as I can. Life is short so why waste it?


NLITEN:

How do your roots influence your production style?


SENECA B:

I grew up listening to mostly rock and heavy metal music, but I think that’s actually had a bigger effect than some of the new music I listen to. With more hip-hop/electronic music I take cues and influences directly from the song, like if I like a certain synth sound or the way someone compressed their snare. In that way I think my newer influences have more of a technical impression with me where I try to emulate a sound. On the other hand, I think I developed a much more emotional connection with music I listened to growing up. Music was one of the few things that got me through the rough times and I think I developed an appreciation for the kind of music that people can relate to and that helps me express things, even if I don’t make the kind of stuff I used to listen to.


NLITEN:

You work closely with a variety of artists. We all know collaboration can be a blessing and a curse. Do you have any tips for working with other artists?


SENECA B:

I think trust is the biggest factor in working with someone else. Some of the most promising collabs have fallen through because of a lack of communication and misunderstanding. It’s one of those things where I feel you have to negotiate between confidence in your music and skill and being able to accept others’ opinions on it. It’s hard sometimes but I think it can be so worth it!


NLITEN:

Boston’s music & arts scene has grown considerably in the last few years. What is the most exciting part of all this for you?


SENECA B:

I think my favorite part about it is seeing people meeting their potential. I’ve met so many crazy good artists over the last few years in Boston and I’ve seen them all improve. I love seeing people succeed so I just can’t wait to follow everyone and see where they end up!


NLITEN:

Where do u see yourself in 5-10 years?


SENECA B:

This is a terrible answer but I can’t really see that far ahead. I know 5 years ago I never would’ve thought I’d be here right now going to law school or making music on my computer so I really couldn’t tell you what I might be doing in another 5. I know I’ll still (hopefully) be making music and probably doing lawyer things somewhere in the world but other than that I don’t really know.